In Ableton Live you have Session and Arrangement View from which you can export audio. This can be quite confusing at first and if you don't understand how it's done you might end up with rendered silence or too short audio files. So here's the gist of it.

Exporting from Arrangement View:

  1. Most often you want to export the whole song you've created or its individual tracks. To do this, you need to have it recorded into Arrangement View first. If you don't know how, here's the tutorial for it.
  2. Drag the Loop Start and Loop End so the Loop covers the whole length of the song including all effect tails (reverb, delay) to be exported. Make sure the Loop is selected.
  3. Make sure that no tracks are muted that you want to include and no tracks are soloed, because what you hear is what will be exported. You can listen to the song once more to ensure it's all good.
  4. Choose 'Export Audio/Video' from the File Menu or use the shortcut SHIFT + Ctrl + R (Windows) or SHIFT + Cmd + R (Mac). This will open the Export dialog.
  5. Choose your preferred rendering options (details below), then click OK.
  6. You can now choose the location to which the audio file(s) will be saved. Click Save and the rendering process will start.

Exporting from Session View:

  1. When exporting Session View clips, only clips with activated clip launch buttons are rendered. So make sure that all clips you want to export are launched first.
  2. Choose 'Export Audio/Video' from the File Menu or use the shortcut SHIFT + Ctrl + R (Windows) or SHIFT + Cmd + R (Mac). This will open the Export dialog.
  3. When exporting from Session View you need to enter the desired Length in bars, beats and 16th.
  4. Choose your preferred rendering options (details below), then click OK.
  5. You can now choose the location to which the audio file(s) will be saved. Click Save and the rendering process will start.

Audio Rendering Options:

  • 'Rendered Track' options:
  • If you want to export the mixdown of the song, choose Master.
  • 'All Tracks' will render all individual tracks to separate audio files. That includes all MIDI and audio tracks as well as return tracks.
  • Or you can choose a specific individual track. You can easily find the one you want since the track numbers and names are listed.
  • All options will render the post-fader signals including insert effects.
  • Turn on Normalize if you want the file to be rendered with maximum volume.
  • 'Render as Loop' lets you render the file as a loop including any effect tails.
  • You have the choice between Wav (Windows format) and Aiff (Mac format) under 'File Type'.
  • 'Convert to Mono' will render the file in mono. Live handles everything in stereo. This option is useful if you want mono files to be used in a different audio software or want to include mono files in your Live Set to keep it small.
  • 'Sample Rate': To burn it to an audio CD, choose 44100. For mastering choose the 'Sample Rate' you had used throughout your production or the mastering studio asked for.
  • 'Bit Depth': To burn it to an audio CD, choose 16. For mastering choose the 'Bit Depth' you had used in your Live Set or the mastering studio asked for.
  • Dither: Dithering introduces small noise, but helps avoid artifacts when reducing the bit depth. Live handles audio internally in 32-bit. Dithering should only be done at the end when you won't export the file again. This is generally after mastering the track or when you want to burn it on CD. If you choose to not export in 32-bit and want to keep working with the audio file, Triangular is the safest mode. Rectangular adds less noise, but can add artifacts once the audio file is processed further. The 3 POW-r options introduce even less noise pushed above the audible range. These should never be used when processing audio further.
  • 'Create Analysis File': Turn it on if you want to import the rendered file back into a Live Set.

Do you have any questions or comments? Let me know.

There are plenty more Ableton Live tutorials where this one came from.